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#TakePride campaign
"We're not born with pride. We take pride. Pride in celebrating who we were born to be."

Making parenthood possible in the LGBT+ community

OneWorld Generations wholeheartedly supports the LGBT community and is committed to assisting LGBT intended parents in achieving their family aspirations. With a team that includes staff members from the LGBT community, some of whom have already built their own families through egg/sperm donation and surrogacy, the organization understands the unique needs and desires of LGBT individuals. OneWorld Generations is dedicated to listening attentively to the needs of every member of the LGBT community and strives to provide the utmost support, love, and hope in helping them realize their dreams of parenthood. The organization believes that children can bring immense joy and serve as a source of happiness in every LGBT family. By nurturing their children with unwavering love and care, LGBT parents create stable and harmonious homes where love remains forever fresh.
 
OneWorld Generations encourages all LGBT individuals, whether partnered or single, to consider the profound impact and fulfillment that having a child can bring. Each baby deserves to grow up in an environment filled with love and nurturing. In this light, OneWorld Generations urges every member of the LGBT community to carefully consider the various factors involved before embarking on this significant and life-changing decision.
LGBTQ+ Parents ,

Is it the right timing to be a parent?

LGBTQ+ Parents ,

Willingness

• Have you had a thorough communication with your partner before making a decision?
• How long have you been with your partner, and how is your relationship, trustful and stable?
• Can you have family support if you raise baby with your partner?

LGBTQ+ Parents ,

Finance

• What is your and your partner's income status and what is the trend of your income over the next few years?
• Do you and your partner have the financial strength to nurture and raise the baby right now?
• Are you and your partner able to go through the surrogacy process with the help of family, friends or a loan?

LGBTQ+ Parents ,

Planning

• What are your future plans with your partner, including but not limited to location, occupation, lifestyle and interactions with parents and relatives.
• How do you and your partner plan for child, including but not limited to how to explain where they came from, how to establish their relationship with families, and plans of their future schools, classmates and friends circle before and after growing up.

LGBTQ+ Parents ,

Responsibility

• Are you and your partner responsible for each other, the family, and child?
• Do you and your partner have enough energy, emotion and finance to raise a child?
• Are you and your partner committed to each other and to your child?

I want to establish my family

Click the following picture to view the matching process

LGBT FAQs

What is the difference between gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy?

There are two types of surrogacy—traditional surrogacy and gestational surrogacy.

Traditional Surrogacy:

In which the surrogate either undergoes artificial insemination or IVF with sperm from the male or from a sperm donor. The surrogate herself provides the eggs and is therefore genetically related to the child. This form of surrogacy is the older method and because of the genetic link between the surrogate and the baby, there is some downside risk to this form of surrogacy.

Gestational Surrogacy:

In which the surrogate carries a pregnancy and delivers a child that is created from the egg and the sperm of the intended parents and/or donor egg and /or donor sperm and/or donated embryos in any combination. The key to this type of surrogacy is that the gestational surrogate is not genetically related to the child and acts only as a gestational carrier for the pregnancy.

​Can I be a parent if I'm a single gay man? Single woman? Trans individual?

As a surrogacy agency, we believe that everyone should have the opportunity to become a parent, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity. We work with individuals and couples of all backgrounds, including single gay men, single women, and trans individuals who wish to pursue surrogacy as a means of building their family.

Our agency adheres to all applicable laws and regulations regarding surrogacy, and we ensure that all parties involved in the surrogacy arrangement are informed and supported throughout the process. We believe that surrogacy can be a positive and rewarding experience for everyone involved, and we are committed to helping our clients achieve their dreams of parenthood.

How do I select an egg donor?

If you are considering selecting an egg donor, there are a few important steps to take:

Consult with a healthcare professional: It’s important to speak with a fertility specialist or other healthcare professional to discuss your options and any medical considerations.

Choose a reputable clinic or agency: Look for a clinic or agency that has a good reputation and adheres to ethical standards for egg donation.

Review donor profiles: Most clinics or agencies will provide you with profiles of potential egg donors, which may include information about their physical characteristics, educational background, medical history, and personal interests.

Consider your priorities: Think about what qualities are important to you in an egg donor. For example, you may prioritize physical resemblance, educational background, or similar interests.

Ask questions: Don’t be afraid to ask questions about the egg donor, such as their motivations for donating, any medical or psychological concerns, or whether they have donated eggs before.

Consider legal and financial considerations: It’s important to review any legal or financial agreements associated with egg donation, including the donor’s compensation and any expectations for contact with the child.

Ultimately, selecting an egg donor is a personal decision and should be made after careful consideration and consultation with a healthcare professional.

Will I have contact with my egg donor?

Whether or not you will have contact with your egg donor will depend on the specific arrangements made between you and the donor, as well as any legal agreements you have in place.

In some cases, egg donation arrangements are made anonymously, meaning that the donor’s identity is not shared with the intended parent or child. In other cases, the intended parent may choose to have a semi-open or open donation, in which some level of contact or information sharing is allowed between the donor and the intended parent or child.

If you choose to pursue a semi-open or open donation, it’s important to discuss the terms of the arrangement with the donor and any legal representatives involved. This may include guidelines for communication or visits, as well as any expectations for financial or emotional support.

It’s also important to consider the potential emotional impact of having contact with the donor or the child’s biological siblings, and to work with a mental health professional or support group as needed.

Ultimately, the decision to have contact with an egg donor is a personal one and should be made after careful consideration of all options and with the guidance of healthcare professionals and legal experts.

What is the difference between a proven donor and first-time donor?

A “proven donor” is an egg donor who has already undergone a cycle of egg donation and produced viable eggs that were successfully fertilized and resulted in a pregnancy. In contrast, a “first-time donor” is an egg donor who has never donated eggs before and has no previous record of successful egg retrievals.

Some intended parents or fertility clinics may prefer to work with a proven donor because they have a better chance of producing viable eggs, and there is a higher likelihood of success with the subsequent fertility treatments. However, first-time donors can also be highly successful and may be chosen for their specific characteristics or qualities.

It’s important to note that the screening process for egg donors is rigorous, regardless of whether they are proven or first-time donors. All potential egg donors undergo medical and psychological evaluations, as well as genetic testing and screenings for infectious diseases, to ensure that they are healthy and suitable for egg donation.

Ultimately, the decision to work with a proven or first-time donor will depend on the individual circumstances of the intended parent(s) and their preferences, as well as any medical or ethical considerations.

Are the egg donors anonymous or known?

Whether egg donors are anonymous or known depends on the specific arrangements made between the intended parent(s) and the donor, as well as any legal agreements that are in place.

In some cases, egg donation arrangements are made anonymously, meaning that the donor’s identity is not shared with the intended parent(s) or child. This may be done for various reasons, including the donor’s preference for privacy, or to protect the donor from any legal or emotional responsibilities related to the child.

In other cases, intended parent(s) may choose to work with a known donor, such as a family member or friend, or a donor who is willing to have some level of contact or information sharing with the intended parent(s) or child.

Some intended parents may also choose to pursue a semi-open or open donation, in which some level of contact or information sharing is allowed between the donor and the intended parent(s) or child.

It’s important to note that the legal and ethical considerations of egg donation can vary depending on whether the donor is anonymous or known, and it’s important to work with healthcare professionals and legal experts to ensure that all parties involved are protected and well-informed.

Why do women choose to become surrogates (gestational carriers)?

Women choose to become gestational carriers (surrogates) for a variety of reasons, but many are motivated by a desire to help others achieve their dream of having a child. Here are some of the common reasons that women choose to become surrogates:

Empathy and compassion: Many women have experienced the joy of motherhood themselves and want to help others who may be struggling with infertility or other issues that prevent them from having a child.

Desire to make a difference: Becoming a gestational carrier can be a way for women to make a positive impact on someone else’s life and contribute to a greater good.

Financial compensation: Surrogacy can provide a source of income for women who may be in need of financial support.

Positive experiences with pregnancy and childbirth: Some women may have had easy, uncomplicated pregnancies and deliveries and want to share that experience with others.

Personal connections: Some women become gestational carriers for friends or family members who are unable to have a child on their own.

It’s important to note that becoming a gestational carrier is a significant commitment that requires careful consideration and preparation. Women who are interested in becoming gestational carriers should undergo thorough medical and psychological screenings and work with experienced professionals who can guide them through the process.

How are surrogate applicants screened?

Surrogate applicants are typically screened through a thorough medical and psychological evaluation process to ensure that they are physically and emotionally capable of carrying a pregnancy for someone else. The screening process may vary depending on the surrogacy agency or program, but here are some of the common steps involved:

Initial application and interview: The surrogate applicant will typically fill out an initial application that includes information about their medical history, lifestyle, and personal background. They may also have an initial interview with a surrogacy coordinator or caseworker to discuss their motivations and expectations for the process.

Medical evaluation: The surrogate will undergo a comprehensive medical evaluation, including a physical exam, blood tests, and screenings for infectious diseases. They may also undergo an ultrasound and other diagnostic tests to evaluate their reproductive health.

Psychological evaluation: The surrogate will undergo a psychological evaluation to assess their mental health and emotional readiness for the surrogacy process. This may include a clinical interview and standardized psychological assessments.

Legal review: The surrogate will typically work with a surrogacy attorney to review and sign a surrogacy agreement that outlines the terms of the arrangement, including financial compensation, medical procedures, and expectations for contact or confidentiality.

Matching process: Once the surrogate has been medically and psychologically cleared, they may be matched with intended parents who are seeking a gestational carrier.

The screening process is designed to ensure that the surrogate is physically and emotionally capable of carrying a pregnancy for someone else and that they fully understand the expectations and responsibilities involved in the surrogacy process. It’s important to work with experienced professionals who can guide you through the screening process and help ensure a successful surrogacy journey.

What are the requirements to become a surrogate (gestational carrier)?

The requirements to become a gestational carrier (surrogate) can vary depending on the surrogacy agency or program, but here are some common requirements:

Age: Most surrogacy programs require gestational carriers to be between the ages of 21 and 40, although some may have more flexible age requirements.

Prior pregnancies: Gestational carriers are typically required to have had at least one successful pregnancy and delivery without complications.

Health and lifestyle: Gestational carriers must be in good physical and mental health and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including abstaining from drugs, tobacco, and excessive alcohol consumption.

BMI: Gestational carriers must meet certain body mass index (BMI) requirements to ensure that they are physically capable of carrying a pregnancy.

Location: It is essential that surrogates are selected from surrogacy-friendly states where the laws are supportive of surrogacy activities.

Financial stability: Gestational carriers must be financially stable and able to support themselves during the surrogacy process.

Support network: Gestational carriers must have a strong support network, including a partner or spouse who is supportive of the surrogacy process.

It’s important to note that becoming a gestational carrier is a significant commitment that requires careful consideration and preparation. Gestational carriers should undergo thorough medical and psychological evaluations and work with experienced professionals who can guide them through the process and provide ongoing support.

The legal process for gay men using a surrogate to have a child can vary depending on the specific circumstances and the laws of the country or state involved. Here is a general overview:
 
Before the birth, the intended parents and surrogate usually create a surrogacy agreement with the assistance of legal professionals. This agreement establishes the terms of the arrangement, including financial and medical responsibilities.
 
In some jurisdictions, it may be necessary for the intended parents to obtain a court order prior to the birth to establish their legal parentage. This could entail meeting specific legal criteria, such as demonstrating a genetic connection.
 
After the birth, the intended parents must secure a birth certificate that recognizes them as the legal parents. Depending on local laws, additional documentation like a court order or DNA testing may be required.
 
In certain cases, an adoption or parentage order might be necessary to further solidify the intended parents’ legal rights.
 
It is essential for gay men pursuing surrogacy to work closely with knowledgeable legal professionals who can provide guidance throughout the process and ensure the protection of their parental rights. Given the variation in surrogacy laws, conducting thorough research and seeking expert assistance are crucial in navigating the specific requirements of the jurisdiction involved.
 
Watch a video about our legal process to understand it better.
Will I need an attorney?

If you are considering using a surrogate to have a child, it is highly recommended that you consult with an attorney who has experience in surrogacy law. A surrogacy attorney can help you navigate the legal process and ensure that your parental rights are protected.

Here are some of the ways that a surrogacy attorney can assist you:

Reviewing and drafting legal agreements: Your attorney can help you draft a surrogacy agreement that outlines the terms of the arrangement, including financial and medical responsibilities, as well as any expectations for contact or parental rights.

Ensuring compliance with laws and regulations: Your attorney can help ensure that you are complying with all applicable laws and regulations regarding surrogacy in your jurisdiction, including any requirements for parentage orders or adoptions.

Facilitating communication and negotiations: Your attorney can help facilitate communication and negotiations between you and the surrogate, as well as any other parties involved in the surrogacy process.

Representing your interests in court: In some cases, you may need to go to court to establish your parental rights. Your attorney can represent your interests and help you navigate the legal system.

Working with a surrogacy attorney can be an important step in ensuring that your surrogacy journey is successful and legally protected. It’s important to choose an attorney who is experienced in surrogacy law and who can provide personalized guidance and support throughout the process.

Will there be contracts with my surrogate or egg donor?

Yes, there will typically be legal contracts involved in the surrogacy or egg donation process. These contracts are designed to protect the rights and interests of all parties involved, and to establish the terms of the agreement in writing.

For surrogacy, the intended parents and the surrogate will typically work with a surrogacy agency or a lawyer to draft a surrogacy agreement that outlines the terms of the arrangement, including financial and medical responsibilities, as well as any expectations for contact or parental rights. The agreement may also address issues such as termination of the pregnancy, selective reduction, or other potential complications.

For egg donation, the intended parents and the egg donor will typically sign an egg donation agreement that outlines the terms of the agreement, including financial compensation, medical procedures, and any expectations for contact or confidentiality. The agreement may also address issues such as ownership of the eggs, disposition of any unused embryos, or potential genetic testing.

It’s important to work with experienced legal professionals who have expertise in surrogacy or egg donation law to ensure that these contracts are properly drafted and legally enforceable. These contracts can provide important protections for all parties involved and can help prevent misunderstandings or disputes down the line.

Will there be contracts with my surrogate or egg donor?

Yes, there will typically be legal contracts involved in the surrogacy or egg donation process. These contracts are designed to protect the rights and interests of all parties involved, and to establish the terms of the agreement in writing.

For surrogacy, the intended parents and the surrogate will typically work with a surrogacy agency or a lawyer to draft a surrogacy agreement that outlines the terms of the arrangement, including financial and medical responsibilities, as well as any expectations for contact or parental rights. The agreement may also address issues such as termination of the pregnancy, selective reduction, or other potential complications.

For egg donation, the intended parents and the egg donor will typically sign an egg donation agreement that outlines the terms of the agreement, including financial compensation, medical procedures, and any expectations for contact or confidentiality. The agreement may also address issues such as ownership of the eggs, disposition of any unused embryos, or potential genetic testing.

It’s important to work with experienced legal professionals who have expertise in surrogacy or egg donation law to ensure that these contracts are properly drafted and legally enforceable. These contracts can provide important protections for all parties involved and can help prevent misunderstandings or disputes down the line.